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Common Sources of Retirement Income

Common Sources of Retirement Income

Does retirement income sound like an oxymoron? It’s understandable—most people’s only source of income is their job.

But by definition, your job ceases to become your source of income once you retire.

Instead, you’ll need to tap into new forms of cash flow that, most likely, will need to be prepared beforehand.

Here are the most common sources of retirement income. Take note, because they could be critical to your retirement strategy.

Social Security. It’s simple—you pay into social security via your taxes, and you’re entitled to a monthly check from Uncle Sam once you retire. It’s no wonder why it’s the most commonly utilized source of retirement income.

Just know that social security alone may not afford you the retirement lifestyle you desire—the average monthly payment is only $1,543.¹ Fortunately, it’s far from your only option.

Retirement Saving Accounts. These types of accounts might be via your employer or you might have one independently. They are also popular options because they can benefit from the power of compound interest. The assumption is that when you retire, you’ll have grown enough wealth to live on for the rest of your life.

But they aren’t retirement silver bullets. They often are exposed to risk, meaning you can lose money as well as earn it. They also might be subject to different tax scenarios that aren’t necessarily favorable.

If you have a retirement savings account of any kind, meet with a licensed and qualified financial professional. They can evaluate how it fits into your overarching financial strategy.

Businesses and Real Estate. Although they are riskier and more complex, these assets can also be powerful retirement tools.

If you own a business or real estate, it’s possible that they can sustain the income generated by their revenue and rents, respectively, through retirement. Best of all, they may only require minimal upkeep on your part!

Again, starting a business and buying properties for income carry considerable risks. It’s wise to consult with a financial professional and find experienced mentorship before relying on them for retirement cash flow.

Part-time work. Like it or not, some people will have to find opportunities to sustain their lifestyle through retirement. It’s not an ideal solution, but it may be necessary, depending on your financial situation.

You may even discover that post-retirement work becomes an opportunity to pursue other hobbies, passions, or interests. Retirement can be about altering the way you live, not just having less to do.

You can’t prepare for retirement if you don’t know what to prepare for. And that means knowing and understanding your options for creating a sustainable retirement income. If unsure of how you’ll accomplish that feat, sit down with your financial professional. They can help you evaluate your position and create a realistic strategy that can truly prepare you for retirement.

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or policies that may be available to you. Any examples used in this article are hypothetical. Before enacting a savings or retirement strategy, or purchasing a life insurance policy, seek the advice of a licensed and qualified financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.


¹ “How much Social Security will I get?” AARP, https://www.aarp.org/retirement/social-security/questions-answers/how-much-social-security-will-i-get.html


What to Do First If You Receive an Inheritance

What to Do First If You Receive an Inheritance

In many households, nearly every penny is already accounted for even before it’s earned.

The typical household budget that covers the cost of raising a family, making loan payments, and saving for retirement usually doesn’t leave much room for extra spending on daydream items. However, occasionally families may come into an inheritance, you might receive a big bonus at work, or benefit from some other sort of windfall.

If you ever inherit a chunk of money (or large asset) or receive a large payout, it may be tempting to splurge on that red convertible you’ve been drooling over or book that dream trip to Hawaii you’ve always wanted to take. Unfortunately for many, though, newly-found money has the potential to disappear quickly with nothing to show for it, if you don’t have a strategy in place to handle it.

If you do receive some sort of large bonus – congratulations! But take a deep breath and consider these situations first – before you call your travel agent.

Taxes or Other Expenses. If you get a large sum of money unexpectedly, the first thing you might want to do is pull out your bucket list and see what you can check off first. But before you start spending, the reality is you’ll need to put aside some money for taxes. You may want to check with an expert – an accountant or financial advisor may have some ideas on how to reduce your liability as well.

If you suddenly own a new house or car as part of an inheritance, one thing that you may not have considered is how much it will cost to hang on to them. If you want to keep them, you’ll need to cover maintenance, insurance, and you may even need to fulfill loan payments if they aren’t paid off yet.

Pay Down Debt. If you have any debt, you’d have a hard time finding a better place to put your money once you’ve set aside some for taxes or other expenses that might be involved. It may be helpful to target debt in this order:

  1. Credit card debt: These are often the highest interest rate debt and usually don’t have any tax benefit. Pay these off first.
  2. Personal loans: Pay these off next. You and your friend/family member will be glad you knocked these out!
  3. Auto loans: Interest rates on auto loans are lower than credit cards, but cars depreciate rapidly – very rapidly. If you can avoid it, you don’t want to pay interest on a rapidly depreciating asset. Pay off the car as quickly as possible.
  4. College loans: College loans often have tax-deductible interest but there is no physical asset you can convert to cash – there’s just the loan.
  5. Home loans: Most home loans are also tax-deductible. Since your home value is likely appreciating over time, you may be better off putting your money elsewhere rather than paying off the home loan early.

Fund Your Emergency Account. Before you buy that red convertible, put aside some money for a rainy day. This could be liquid funds – like a separate savings account.

Save for Retirement. Once the taxes are covered, you’ve paid down your debt, and funded your emergency account, now is the time to put some money away towards retirement. Work with your financial professional to help create the best strategy for you and your family.

Fund That College Fund. If you have kids and haven’t had a chance to save all you’d like towards their education, setting aside some money for this comes next. Again, your financial professional can recommend the best strategy for this scenario.

Treat Yourself. NOW you’re ready to go bury your toes in the sand and enjoy some new experiences! Maybe you and the family have always wanted to visit a themed resort park or vacation on a tropical island. If you’ve taken care of business responsibly with the items above and still have some cash left over – go ahead! Treat yourself!


The Greatest Financial Mistake Young People Make

The Greatest Financial Mistake Young People Make

Everyone makes mistakes—some more severe than others.

There’s a significant financial mistake people in their 20s and 30s make. It’s simple, but if you’re young, it could change your financial future…

Have you made this mistake? Think you know what it is?

Young people don’t save enough. Not by a long shot. On average, Millennials have only saved $23,000 for retirement.¹ And a recent survey revealed that 65% of 50 year olds felt the greatest financial mistake of their 20s and 30s was not saving.² It’s no wonder, then, that the same group feels they have under-saved and under-prepared for retirement.

So what can you do if you’re a young person seeking to build wealth? Here are three ideas…

Automate saving every month. The power of automation makes saving easy. Saving stops being a conscious decision with which you may or may not follow through. Instead, it’s a background process you can set and forget.

Meet with a financial professional. They’re the guides you need for navigating the world of budgeting, saving, and building wealth. They can help you identify the goals and strategies you need to inspire your savings.

Focus on your own financial growth. Comparing your lifestyle to your peers is tempting, especially when you’re young. But it can be dangerous, especially if it causes you to spend more than you earn. Just remember—you may not really know the financial situation of your friends as presented on social media. People tend to just show the good and not the bad. Orient yourself towards improving your own situation and building your future.

So don’t make the mistake that so many have made. Follow the tips in this article and start laying the foundation of your financial future.

¹ “Retirement Security Amid COVID-19: The Outlook of Three Generations 20th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey of Workers,” Transamerica Center For Retirement Studies, May 2020, https://transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/retirement-survey-of-workers/tcrs2020_sr_retirement_security_amid_covid-19.pdf

² “Money Mistakes: Exploring the financial situation of people over 50,” Caring Advisor, https://caringadvisor.com/money-mistakes/


The Key to Successful Saving

The Key to Successful Saving

For many, saving is not a priority.

There are a lot of reasons why. It takes planning and self-control. You’ll have to ask yourself if you can fit every purchase into your budget. It means giving up something today in order to benefit tomorrow.

These are all true, but saving doesn’t have to be hard work. One way to make it easier is to automate your savings and then watch your balance grow!

Automation is such a powerful tool because it makes saving effortless. With automation, saving is now a default, as opposed to a decision—you’re always saving in the background.

For example, you might have a goal to save $1,000 for a vacation. If you’re saving $20 per week, that would take less than a year. And the same logic applies to larger goals—it’s a key strategy for creating retirement wealth.

First, decide how much money you can afford to save each month. Then set up automatic deposits from your main bank account into your savings account. That’s it! Every month, money will go straight from your paycheck to your wealth building efforts.

Now, you’re positioned to go about your daily business, confident that you’re preparing for the future. And it only takes a few minutes to do! If you want to discover more wealth building strategies, contact me. We can review your financial situation and create a game plan.


How to Budget for Beginners

How to Budget for Beginners

Everybody needs a budget.

But that doesn’t stop “budget” from being an intimidating word to many people. Some folks may think it means scrimping on everything and never going out for a night on the town. It doesn’t! Budgeting simply means that you know where your money is going and you have a way to track it.

The aim with budgeting is to be aware of your spending, plan for your expenses1, and make sure you have enough saved to pursue your goals.

Without a budget, it can be easy for expenses to climb beyond your ability to pay for them. You break out the plastic and before you know it you’ve spent fifty bucks on drinks and appetizers with the gang after work. These habits might leave you with a lot of accumulated debt. Plus, without a budget, you may not be saving for a rainy day, vacation, or your retirement. A budget allows you to enact a strategy to help pursue your goals. But what if you’ve never had a budget? Where should you start? Here’s a quick step-by-step guide on how to get your budgeting habit off the ground!

Track your expenses every day. Start by tracking your expenses. Write down everything you buy, including memberships, online streaming services, and subscriptions. It’s not complicated to do with popular mobile and web applications. You can also buy a small notebook to keep track of each purchase. Even if it’s a small pack of gum from the gas station or a quick coffee at the corner shop, jot it down. Keep track of the big stuff too, like your rent and bill payments.

Add up expenses every week and develop categories. Once you’ve collected enough data, it’s time to figure out where exactly your paycheck is going. Start with adding up your expenses every week. How much are you spending? What are you spending money on? As you add your spending up, start developing categories. The goal is to organize all your expenses so you can see what you’re spending money on. For example, if you eat out a few times per week, group those expenses under a category called “Eating Out”. Get as general or as specific as you wish. Maybe throwing all your food purchases into one bucket is all you need, or you may want to break it down by location - grocery store, big box store, restaurants, etc.

Create a monthly list of expenses. Once you’ve recorded your expenses for a full month, it’s time to create a monthly list. Now you might also have more clarity on how you want to set up your categories. Next, total each category for the month.

Adjust your spending as necessary. Compare your total expenses with your income. There are two possible outcomes. You may be spending within your income or spending outside your income. If you’re spending within your income, create a category for savings if you don’t have one. It’s a good idea to create a separate savings category for large future purchases too, like a home or a vacation. If you find you’re spending too much, you may need to cut back spending in some categories. The beauty of a budget is that once you see how much you’re spending, and on what, you’ll be able to strategize where you need to cut back.

Keep going. Once you develop the habit of budgeting, it should become part of your routine. You can look forward to working on your savings and developing a retirement strategy, but don’t forget to budget in a little fun too!


¹Jeremy Vohwinkle, “Make a Personal Budget in 6 Steps: A Step-by-Step Guide to Make a Budget,” The Balance (March 6, 2020).


Four Ways Parents Can Help Their Children Build Wealth

Four Ways Parents Can Help Their Children Build Wealth

Creating a financial legacy isn’t just for the wealthy.

Parents, you may be better positioned to build a legacy for your children than you think. That’s because if you leverage basic financial concepts and strategies, you might be surprised by how attainable a sizable inheritance is! Here are four ways you can help your child build wealth.

Save a nest egg for your child’s retirement. Do you have a million dollars lying around to give to your child? Probably not. But you have something that’s even more valuable—time.

What if the moment your child was born you put $13,000 in an account earning 6.5% interest? By the time they turn 67—even if you don’t add anything else to that account—it would be worth $1,000,000. That cash could make all the difference for your child’s financial future. To make the most of this strategy, meet with a licensed and qualified financial professional before your child is born. They can help you make the preparations to put it into place.

Start saving for college. A college education is a huge expense, and it’s one that will only increase in cost. So what should you do to prepare for this future burden?

Start saving as soon as your child is born! The same principle applies—the sooner you start saving, the greater your potential for growth. Once again, collaborate with a financial professional before your child is born to maximize this strategy.

Adjust your emergency fund. Nothing can derail well-laid financial plans quite like an unforeseen emergency. And nobody seems to attract unforeseen emergencies quite like kids!

That’s why it’s important to create an emergency fund to cover 3-6 months of income. It’s a time-proven line of defense that can protect you from dipping into your savings or going into debt to cover home repairs or midnight ER visits!

Create a will. Finally, it’s important to consider estate planning. Why? Because it ensures that your wealth and assets are passed down to your children. It’s a final and meaningful way to provide for your family, even if you’re not with them physically. Proper planning can also help shield them from the complexity of estate taxes and the burden of the probate system.

Leaving a financial legacy is far more doable than you may have imagined, and the time to start preparing is NOW. Collaborate with a licensed and qualified financial professional as soon as possible. They’ll point you towards practical steps you can take to start building wealth for your children today.


These Numbers Are Hard to Believe

These Numbers Are Hard to Believe

1.82 billion people log in to Facebook every day.¹ Apple has now sold over 2.2 billion iPhones.² Google processes 2 trillion searches every year.³

And – perhaps the most difficult to believe of them all – the world hotdog eating record stands at 75 dogs in 10 minutes.⁴ I apologize ahead, but just visualize that. Seven hotdogs down the hatch every minute.

Here’s another number that’s almost beyond comprehension: 64% of Americans have less than $10,000 in retirement savings.⁵ You read that correctly. Substantially over half of Americans will reach what should be the finish line of their careers and have almost nothing to show for it. They’ll be forced to either downsize their dreams or trade a retirement on a beach for more hours in a cubicle.

Why share these hard to believe numbers? To motivate you – at whatever age you are today – that you can start saving more right now. If you want to have a million dollars at the age of 65, how much do you need to start saving every month? That depends on your current age. If you’re 25, you’ll need to save a minimum of $158.12 per month. At 35, the amount jumps to $442.00 per month. At 45, it’s $1,317 monthly. At 55, you’ll have to save $4,882.00 per month. And at 60, you’d have to save $12,913.00 every month.

How much do you need to save to hit your goals? What’s the right financial vehicle to help you do it? Getting the answers to these questions right is absolutely critical. Don’t wait to find the answers. Contact me, and let’s get to work on a strong insurance strategy.


¹ “The Top 20 Valuable Facebook Statistics – Updated October 2020,” Dan Noyes, Zephoria, https://zephoria.com/top-15-valuable-facebook-statistics/

² “How Many iPhones Have Been Sold Worldwide? – iPhone Sales Analyzed,” Damjan Jugovic Spajic, Kammando Tech, February 11, 2020, https://kommandotech.com/statistics/how-many-iphones-have-been-sold-worldwide/#:~:text=The%20latest%20data%20shows%20that,have%20been%20sold%20so%20far.

³ “Marketing Metrics: Daily Searches on Google and Useful Search Metrics for Marketers,” Kenshoo, Feb 25, 2019, https://kenshoo.com/monday-morning-metrics-daily-searches-on-google-and-other-google-facts/#:~:text=Although%20Google%20does%20not%20share,That’s%20a%20lot%20of%20searches!

⁴ “Hall of Fame,” Nathan’s Famous, https://nathansfamous.com/hot-dog-eating-contest/hall-of-fame/

⁵ “21+ American Savings Statistics to Know in 2021,” Milan Urosevic, SpendMeNot, Mar 25, 2021, https://spendmenot.com/blog/american-savings-statistics/


The 5 Things To Do With Your Inheritance

The 5 Things To Do With Your Inheritance

If you are in the position of receiving an inheritance, congratulations!

You have a chance to make your life even better with this gift. However, it’s important to handle it wisely so you don’t create any regrets down the line!

Pay down debt. Receiving a sudden windfall is the perfect opportunity to take a chunk out of any credit card debt or student loans that are hanging over you. You may even be able to pay off your car or house!

The simple fact is that debt wears down your ability to build wealth. Using your inheritance to help pay off your loans can position you to start building wealth sooner rather than later.

Build your emergency fund. Having cash on hand can be a game-changer. It empowers you to tackle emergencies like a child’s broken arm, an unexpected car repair, or even short-term unemployment—without turning to debt.

If you don’t have three months of expenses saved, consider using your inheritance to create some financial peace of mind for your family by setting up an emergency fund.

Save for retirement. Now that you’ve covered your bases, you can start using your inheritance to start building wealth for the future. As soon as you can, meet with a licensed and qualified financial professional to start developing a strategy that will make your money work for your future!

Fund your kids’ college education. College is pricey. Whether your children are very young or almost at university age, now is a good time to start saving for college. Once again, it’s best to meet with a financial professional to decide the best way to go about funding your child’s education.

Finally, have fun! You’ve done the hard work of getting rid of debt and building your emergency fund. Now that you have a college education and/or your retirement savings strategies in place, there’s no reason not to splurge on something fun with your inheritance! Just be sure that your fun doesn’t send you back into debt or dip into your emergency fund!


Two Techniques to Help You Prepare for Retirement

Two Techniques to Help You Prepare for Retirement

As with anything important, saving for retirement can be intimidating.

It’s a natural instinct to avoid tasks that seem overwhelming. But not preparing adequately for retirement can have serious consequences—you may find yourself rapidly approaching that time in your life with little saved!

Here are two simple, actionable steps that can help you overcome the intimidation of saving and move you closer towards your financial goals.

Save 15% of your income. This is a good rule to follow for the long term, but it may not be realistic all the time. Elderly parents living with you? A child going through college? If saving 15% feels impossible or overwhelming, start by setting aside something more manageable. Saving 1% of your income may not feel like much, but it’s far better than putting away nothing! And once you get used to saving, you might be surprised by how eager you are to increase that percentage.

Automate savings so they happen without any effort on your part. Set up an automatic monthly transfer from your checking into your savings accounts. This way, you’ll never have to worry about forgetting or neglecting your savings. It’s helpful to schedule the transfer right after you get paid. This technique, called “paying yourself first”, results in your paycheck helping to build wealth for you, and not someone else!

It’s never too early–or too late–to start saving for retirement. The earlier you begin, the more time your money has to grow and compound over a lifetime. And even starting closer to retirement is still better than never starting at all! Begin with these two techniques, and develop your strategy from there.


Protecting and Growing Your Emergency Fund

Protecting and Growing Your Emergency Fund

Nearly 25% of Americans report that they have ZERO dollars saved for an emergency.¹

If something unexpected were to happen, do you have enough savings to get you and your family through it and back to solid ground again?

If you’re not sure you have enough set aside, being blindsided with an emergency might leave you in the awkward position of asking family or friends for a loan to tide you over. Or would you need to rack up credit card debt to get through a crisis? Dealing with a financial emergency can be stressful enough – like an unexpected hospital visit, car repairs, or even a sudden loss of employment. But having an established Emergency Fund in place before something happens can help you focus on what you need to do to get on the other side of it.

As you begin to save money to build your Emergency Fund, use these 5 rules to grow and protect your “I did not see THAT coming” stash:

1) Separate your Emergency Fund from your primary spending account. How often does the amount of money in your primary spending account fluctuate? Trips to the grocery store, direct deposit, automatic withdrawals, spontaneous splurges – the ebb and flow in your main household account can make it hard to keep track of the actual emergency money you have available. Open a separate account for your Emergency Fund so you can avoid any doubt about whether or not you can replace the water heater that decided to break right before your in-laws are scheduled to arrive.

2) Do NOT touch this account. Even though this is listed here as Rule #2, it’s really Rule #1. Once you begin setting aside money in your Emergency Fund, “fugettaboutit”… unless there actually is an emergency! Best case scenario, that money is going to sit and wait for a long time until it’s needed. However, just because it’s an “out of sight, out of mind” situation, doesn’t mean that there aren’t some important features that need to be considered for your Emergency Fund account:

  • You must be able to liquidate these funds easily (i.e., not incur penalties if you make too many withdrawals)
  • Funds should be stable (not subject to market shifts)

You definitely don’t want this money to be locked up and/or potentially lose value over time. Although these two qualities might prevent any significant gain to your account, that’s not the goal with these funds. Pressure’s off!

3) Know your number. You may hear a lot about making sure you’re saving enough for retirement and that you should never miss a life insurance premium. Solid advice. But don’t pause either of these important pieces of your financial plan to build your Emergency Fund. Instead, tack building your Emergency Fund onto your existing plan. The same way you know what amount you need to save each month for your retirement and the premium you need to pay for your life insurance policy, know how much you need to set aside regularly so you can build a comfortable Emergency Fund. A goal of at least $1,000 to three months of your income or more is recommended. Three months worth of your salary may sound high, but if you were to lose your job, you’d have at least three full months of breathing room to get back on track.

4) Avoid bank fees. These are Emergency Fund Public Enemy No. 1. Putting extra money aside can be challenging – maybe you’ve finally come to terms with giving up the daily latte from your local coffee shop. But if that precious money you’re sacrificing to save is being whittled away by bank fees – that’s downright tragic! Avoid feeling like you’re paying twice for an emergency (once for the emergency itself and second for the fees) by using an account that doesn’t charge fees and preferably doesn’t have a minimum account balance requirement or has a low one that’s easy to maintain. You should be able to find out what you’re in for on your bank’s website or by talking to an employee.

5) Get started immediately. There’s no better way to grow your Emergency Fund than to get started!

There’s always going to be something. That’s just life. You can avoid that dreaded phone call to your parents (or your children). There’s no need to apply for another credit card (or two). Start growing and protecting your own Emergency Fund today, and give yourself the gift of being prepared for the unexpected.


¹ “Nearly 25% of Americans have no emergency savings,” Quentin Fottrell, MarketWatch, Jun 9, 2020, https://www.marketwatch.com/story/nearly-25-of-americans-have-no-emergency-savings-and-lost-income-due-to-coronavirus-is-piling-on-even-more-debt-2020-06-03


How To Retire With Less

How To Retire With Less

If you had to totally trash your retirement strategy, how would you do it?

There are plenty of extravagant solutions—a gambling spree in Vegas, buying a boat, or shopping only at designer stores would probably do the trick!

But there are less obvious ways to retire with less. There are subtle misteps that may not lead to financial trainwrecks, but may still result in retiring with less. Here are a few!

Never start saving for retirement. The same is true for every undertaking. The easiest way to torpedo your music career? Never practice. It’s unwise to expect your retirement to be financially sound if you don’t start preparing and saving for it today. Starting is the most important step in your journey!

Buy a house you can’t afford. Few things will consume your cash flow and ability to build wealth more than a house that’s out of your budget. Mortgage payments, emergency repairs, and renovations can be costly even after extensive planning and saving. These expenses can scuttle your ability to build wealth if you end up becoming “house poor”.

Buy things you don’t need. Make no mistake—there’s a place for splurging and treating yourself. But there’s a point where buying more stuff simply weighs you down, both emotionally and financially. And if you’re using debt to keep shopping, you might be setting yourself up for less in retirement.

Be afraid of change. It’s incredibly difficult to pursue better opportunities if you fear change. Improving your financial situation, by definition, requires you to do something different, whether it’s spending less or changing careers. Unless you’re already on track for retirement, a fear of change can hinder your ability to reach your goals and live your dreams.

Never learn how money works. This is the easiest item on the list to avoid. Most people are never taught what their money can actually do and how to build wealth. But it can have serious consequences for your future. Not knowing how money works can prevent you from using critical tools like the Rule of 72 and the Power of Compound Interest to detect both bad deals and wealth building opportunities.

If any of these rung a bell with you, contact me. We can discuss strategies to start preparing for retirement, cut your spending, and find opportunities to increase your income!


Wise Financial Moves For Retirees

Wise Financial Moves For Retirees

Retiring can be the most exciting time in a person’s life.

You get to relax and do whatever you want, whenever you want, with whomever you want. But it’s important not to forget about your finances AFTER retirement; here are wise financial moves that retirees should consider once they decide to quit working for good.

Get your will in order. You’ll be ahead of the game if you do—68% of Americans have no estate plan in place!¹ The simple truth is that preparing a will can help ensure that your money goes where you want it to go and save your family a financial headache. If you’re retired and haven’t created a will, do it today!

Plan for long-term care expenses. Why? Because there’s a strong chance you’ll need it—60% of people will need some form of LTC in their lives.² And it can be costly, possibly running into the tens of thousands of dollars. If you’re about to retire or have already retired, consult with a licensed and qualified financial professional about your options for this critical line of financial defense.

Pay off your mortgage! And, if you’ve played your cards correctly, you should be close to paying off your mortgage by the time you retire. Eliminating your home payments may free up a considerable amount of cash for you to spend on your other bills and your retirement lifestyle.

Consider downsizing your home to a smaller property or RV. That is of course, unless you have a huge family you regularly plan on entertaining! But for many, retirement is a perfect opportunity to move into a smaller, easier to manage home.

And if you’re the adventurous type, why not buy an RV? It’s a great way to travel and explore the country now that you’re moving into a new phase of life.

If you’re retiring, it doesn’t mean there aren’t a few key money moves left to be made. Consider these suggestions to be the cherry on top of your years of diligent work and savvy saving!

¹ “68% of Americans do not have a will,” Reid Kress Weisbord, David Horton, The Conversation, May 19, 2020, https://theconversation.com/68-of-americans-do-not-have-a-will-137686

² “What is Long-Term Care (LTC) and Who Needs it?,” LongTermCare.gov, Jan 4, 2021, https://acl.gov/ltc


5 Common Financial Mistakes That Parents Make

5 Common Financial Mistakes That Parents Make

It happens every day. Parents make financial blunders that can impact their children’s future.

These mistakes are often avoidable. But a parent who has the best intentions and lacks the knowledge needed to properly manage their finances may not recognize these errors until the damage has been done.

Here are 5 common financial mistakes every parent should be aware of!

1. Not saving for their children’s education. You know the numbers—it seems higher education is growing more and more expensive every year. So the time to start financially preparing for your child’s university years is today. Meet with a financial professional to discuss how you can pay for college without resorting to student loans!

2. Not saving for retirement. Skimping on your long-term savings might be tempting, especially if your budget feels stretched to the breaking point by the basic expenses of providing for your family!

But saving can support your long-term financial position. It gives you a shot to pay for your own retirement, it can reduce the impact of long-term care on your family, and it might even create a financial legacy to leave to your children.

3. Spending too much on credit cards. It’s not just parents. Many Americans overuse their credit cards. But it can be a little too easy to do for parents on tight budgets. Don’t have enough in cash to buy your child a new toy? Just put it on the card!

Unfortunately, credit cards can become a significant drain on your cash flow. And the less available cash you have on hand, the less you’ll be able to save for your other financial goals!

4. Buying a house they can’t afford. Make no mistake—your family needs space. You need space! Just make sure that the house you buy is actually within your budget. Mortgage payments can chip away at your cash flow and reduce your wealth building and education funding power. And don’t forget to factor in the cost of house maintenance before you move in.

5. Buying things they don’t need to impress other parents. You love your kids and want the best for them. That’s what makes you a great parent!

But be mindful of why you buy things for your family. Are you providing for your kids? Or are you simply trying to impress your friends and neighbors? Take care that you put the wellbeing of your family first, not the opinions of others.

If you need help navigating your financial responsibilities, contact me! We can discuss strategies that might give your family the upper hand they need to thrive.


3 Simple Steps to Prepare for Retirement

3 Simple Steps to Prepare for Retirement

Are you intimidated by the prospect of saving for retirement?

It may not be as daunting as you might think. In fact, there are simple steps you can take today that can help position you to retire with the wealth you desire.

Pay yourself first. It’s simple—schedule a recurring transfer to your retirement savings account when you get your paycheck. This transforms building wealth for your future into an effortless process that occurs without your even thinking about it.

Save your bonuses. Unexpected windfalls are exciting! But don’t forget to pause for a moment before you take off for the Bahamas. If you hadn’t gotten that bonus, would your life and your current financial strategy still be the same as it was last week? Consider putting (most of) that extra money away for later, and using a fraction of it for fun!

Reduce your debt. Credit cards and any high interest loans are the first priority when retiring debt—so that you can retire too someday! Do you really know how much you’re paying in interest each month? (Once you know this number, you can’t “unknow” it.) But take heart! Use this as a powerful incentive to pay those balances off as quickly as you can.

Every month you chip away at your debt, you’ll owe less and pay less in interest. (You’ll feel better too.) And you know what to do with the leftover money since you knocked out that debt. Hint: Save it.

But keep this in mind—life is about balance. It’s okay to treat yourself once in a while. Just make sure to pay yourself first now, so you can REALLY treat yourself later in retirement.


Odds Are You're Going to Need This

Odds Are You're Going to Need This

If there’s one thing that could pose a serious threat to your retirement fund – and hard-earned independence during your Golden Years – it’s the need for long-term care.

7 out of 10 Americans over the age of 65 will need long term care at some point.¹ And the US National Median cost of a private room in a nursing home was $8,821 in 2020.² That’s $92,376 a year!

When you factor in the cost of doctor visits, medical procedures, prescriptions, etc., that number is going to keep climbing.

If your need for long-term care comes after you retire, that financial burden could fall onto your loved ones.

The right life insurance coverage has the potential to keep you living well and independently. Long-term care as a part of a tailored life insurance strategy is a great way to protect your retirement funds – and keep your loved ones’ finances protected, too.

I can help. Contact me today, and together we can explore your options for long-term care – and do what we can to help keep those Golden Years golden.

¹ “Life Insurance: Long-Term Care,” Nationwide, https://www.nationwide.com/personal/insurance/life/long-term-care/

² “Cost of Care Survey,” Genworth, 2020, https://www.genworth.com/aging-and-you/finances/cost-of-care.html


Savings Rates Need Some Serious Saving

Savings Rates Need Some Serious Saving

Ever hear the old story of the 7 years of plenty followed by 7 years of famine?

In the years when there was an abundance of crops, it was wise to store up as much as possible in preparation for the years of famine. However, if instead of saving you ate it all up during the 7 years of abundance, the result would be starvation for you and your family during the 7 lean years. This might be an extreme example in our modern, First World society, but are you “eating it all up” now and not storing enough away for your retirement?

The definition of retirement we’ll be using is: “An indefinite period in which one is no longer actively producing income but rather relies on income generated from pensions and/or personal savings.”

According to this definition, the “years of plenty” would be the years that you are still working and generating income. While you still have regular income, you can set aside a portion of it to save for retirement. This amount is called the “Personal Savings Rate.”

According to the latest statistics, the monthly personal savings rate for Americans is approximately 13.6% of their income.¹ For much of the past decade it’s hovered around 7% to 8%, briefly spiking during the first months of the COVID-19 Pandemic to over 30%.

Suppose you’re looking to retire for at least 10 years (e.g., from 65 years old to 75 years old). Even if you’re planning to live on only half of the income that you were making prior to retirement, you would need to save up 5 years worth of income to last for the 10 years of your retirement. Just raw saving at average rate without the power of interest would take years before it became the wealth most people need to retire.

So unless you’ve found the elixir of everlasting life, we’re going to need to do some serious “saving” of the personal savings rate. Is there a solution to this dilemma? Yes. If you’re looking for possible ways to store up and prepare for your retirement, I’d be happy to have that conversation with you today.

¹ “Personal Saving Rate,” U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Nov 25, 2020, http://bit.ly/2qSGrR3.


When Should You Retire?

When Should You Retire?

Have you ever thought about when you want to retire?

You’ve probably daydreamed about what you want to do when you no longer have to withstand the 9-to-5 routine. But do you know when you want retirement to become a reality?

The average retirement age for people in the US is about 63. However, there’s a large group of people who continue to work past 65.¹ Two motivations that could be contributing to this situation are:

  • They choose to work but don’t have to.
  • They have no choice but to keep working.

It’s apparent that the first option might be preferable to the latter – even if you love what you do.

Here’s why: having the choice is better than having no choice at all. Imagine that as you approach the time when you want to retire that you love your job and experience a lot of satisfaction in what you do. But there’s no option for you to stop even if you wanted to because of bills or obligations to yourself or your family.

As you approach retirement age – whatever that may be – there could be other things in your life that matter to you that come into conflict with the job you love. Some of these “other things” may include (but aren’t limited to) spending time with family, volunteering at an organization you’re passionate about, traveling the world, etc. Except for a lucky few, most can’t both traveling around the world AND work the job they love. That’s when having the resources to choose comes in handy.

It’s important to have a strategy to reach your retirement goals, whether it’s retiring at age 65 or earlier. Having a plan in place doesn’t mean you absolutely have to retire. But at least you’ll have the flexibility to do so!


¹ “Average Retirement Age In The United States,” Dana Anspach, The Balance, Jul 31, 2020, http://bit.ly/2nW9AWJ.


Setting SMART Financial Goals

Setting SMART Financial Goals

So you’ve set some financial goals. Good for you!

But not all goals are created equal. Planning to win the lottery is a foolish objective that won’t help you fulfill your dreams. Spending hours clipping coupons worth a few dollars is probably a waste of time.

Fortunately, establishing proper goals is actually incredibly straightforward. You want to pursue objectives that are SMART—specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timely. Formulating these types of goals can radically focus your energy and increase your ability to get things done. Let’s start with the first criteria!

Specific. The more specific your goal, the more clearly you’ll understand exactly what you need to do to achieve it. It’s the difference between a vague daydream and a solid plan.

When writing out your financial goals, be crystal clear on exactly what you want to accomplish and why. Outline the steps and people needed to bring about your vision. Something like “I want to make more money” becomes “I want to earn a raise at work by taking on more responsibility.”

Measurable. How will you know if you’ve accomplished, exceeded, or failed your goal? Including a clear metric gives you insight into how close or far you are from completing your objective.

Decide on a clear numeric goal you can shoot for. Take a vague notion like “I want to save more money” and transform it into “I want to save 15% of my income this year for retirement.” You’ll have a clearer idea of what steps you need to take to meet that benchmark and feel a deep sense of reward once you hit the target.

Achievable. Trying to attain an ill-defined, pie-in-the-sky goal will only lead to crazy behavior, incredible discouragement, or both. If you’re aiming for something huge (which is admirable), break it down into mini goals and focus on one at a time. Achieving a goal like “I want to start a multi-million dollar business” takes careful planning, a lot of research, and loads of help, but there are many, many people in the world who have done just that. How do you eat an elephant? (One bite at a time!)

Relevant. Are your goals appropriate? That seems like an obvious question, but it’s a critical one to ask when establishing objectives. For instance, saving up $1,000 so you can buy your new niece a Swarovski crystal, gold-plated baby rattle (yes, that’s a real thing) might be really memorable, but do you have an emergency fund in place? Make sure you’re meeting those practical, basic financial goals before you start aiming for the non-essential ones.

Time-sensitive. Knowing that the clock is ticking is one of the most powerful motivators on the planet. You’ll want to establish a realistic time-frame, but deciding that you want to buy a house in two years or be debt free in six months can increase your intensity, narrow your focus, and inspire you to start working on your goals as soon as possible!

Do your financial goals meet these criteria? If not, don’t sweat it! Spend 15 minutes reviewing your objectives and work in specific details or break down some of your more ambitious targets. Remember, I’m here to help if you hit a financial goal roadblock and need some professional insight and clarity!


Why Financial Goals Matter

Why Financial Goals Matter

Setting goals has the power to change your life. Research has shown that people who write down their goals are 33% more successful in accomplishing them than those who don’t.¹ That data seems to verify what we instinctively know. Is there anything worse than working on a project that has no clear objective or outcome defined?

But here’s the million dollar question: Have you written down your financial goals?

It’s one of those simple things that we tell ourselves we’re going to do or that we’ll get around to later, but we tend to leave undone. And that results in our earning, saving, and spending money aimlessly, without purpose. No wonder the majority of 40-somethings and almost a third of people in their 60s are woefully short of having enough for their retirements!²

In case you still need convincing, here are three reasons why you should write down your financial goals the second you’re done reading this article!

Financial goals bring clarity. Imagine trying to build a house without a blueprint. Where would you start? Would you know what supplies you’d need? What color paint you’d want? Would you end up with a basement? Who knows?

Your finances are the same way. Until you have a clear financial goal for your lifestyle and retirement, you’ll never truly know what to do with your money and how it can help you. Once you’re locked in on a vision of your future, you can start exploring the actions necessary to make your dreams become realities.

Financial goals create intensity. Discovering the steps you need to take to achieve your goals cuts away distractions. You’re no longer as susceptible to distractions and temptations because you’re laser-focused on creating an outcome. You can focus all of your mental and financial energy on bringing your vision to life. Clarity leads to focus. Focus creates intensity. Intensity accomplishes goals.

Financial goals are rewarding. There are few better feelings than the one that comes after a day of hard, productive work. That’s because your brain knows that you accomplished what you set out to do.

Your finances are no different.

Setting goals for your money gives you the opportunity to feel that deep sense of reward and accomplishment. It provides your life with a source of gratification that isn’t shallow and instantaneous.

So what are you waiting for? Grab a piece of paper or pull up your note taking app and write down a few financial goals! Be realistic and hyper specific. Let’s talk about what comes to your mind and what it would take to bring that vision of your life into reality!

¹ “Goal-Setting Is Linked to Higher Achievement,” Marilyn Price-Mitchell Ph.D., Psychology Today, Mar 14, 2018, https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-moment-youth/201803/goal-setting-is-linked-higher-achievement

² “Here’s how much Americans have saved for retirement at different ages,” Kathleen Elkins, CNBC Make It, Jan 23, 2020, https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/23/heres-how-much-americans-have-saved-for-retirement-at-different-ages.html


Questions to Ask About Your Retirement Strategy

Questions to Ask About Your Retirement Strategy

So you’ve decided to create a retirement strategy. Good for you!

Will your plans be durable enough to withstand your working years and sustain you through your retirement? The answers to the following questions can help give you clarity on if your retirement strategy has what it takes!

How’s it constructed? Not all savings vehicles are created equal. For instance, stashing all your cash in a mattress until retirement is a great way to torpedo the value of your savings. Why? Because inflation will slowly but surely reduce the value of each dollar you earn today. The same goes for low-interest saving options like CDs, bonds, and checking accounts. Even a 401(k) might not be enough!

Realistically, you want to put your money in a place where it can leverage compound interest. That means the cash you save generates interest, and all the interest you earn also generates interest. Interest earning interest on interest eventually unleashes a huge tidal wave of wealth creation that can help carry you through your final years.

What percent of your income will you live on? Nobody wants to take a pay cut when they retire. But that’s exactly what people relying on Social Security will do; it’s only designed to replace 40% of your annual income!¹ Instead, it’s better to live off of 80% of your salary.²

So what does that number look like now? Assuming you live 30 years after retiring, how much would you need to save before you hit that goal? If you make $60,000, 80% of your income is $48,000. You would need $1,440,000 saved to maintain your lifestyle for three decades.

Once you have that number estimated, determine how much you’ll need to save starting today. You can use a nifty compound interest calculator like this one to get an idea of how much that will be!

Is it tax efficient? There are few surprises nastier than saving for decades only to have the government bite a huge chunk out of your nest egg at the finish line. We won’t dive into the details of taxes now, but you need to decide when you’ll pay Uncle Sam his share. You can either:

Pay now. CDs and Roth IRAs are options where you pay your taxes, then save the money. You end up only paying the tax rate of today.

Pay later. You don’t pay any taxes now, but you cough up a percentage of whatever you earn in the long haul at a future rate. This is how a 401(k) works.

Pay never. No, you don’t have to hire a Swiss lawyer and hide your money on an island to do this. Ask a licensed and qualified professional about legal ways to achieve tax free growth.

Whatever option you choose, make sure you understand its implications for how much you’ll have when you need it.

It’s always best to review your strategy with a licensed and qualified professional. They’ll have insights and knowledge to help you achieve the retirement of your dreams.

¹ “How Much Can I Receive From My Social Security Retirement Benefit?,” Investopedia, Oct 30, 2020, https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/102814/what-maximum-i-can-receive-my-social-security-retirement-benefit.asp#:~:text=The%20maximum%20monthly%20Social%20Security%20benefit%20that%20an%20individual%20can,the%20maximum%20amount%20is%20%242%2C324

² “How Much Money Do You Need to Retire?,” John Waggoner, AARP, Sep 17, 2020, https://www.aarp.org/retirement/planning-for-retirement/info-2020/how-much-money-do-you-need-to-retire/?cmp=RDRCT-3c5a7391-20200917


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