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How To Make A Budget You Can Stick To

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Exercise and Wealth: Which Comes First?

Exercise and Wealth: Which Comes First?

It’s a fact—the wealthy work out. But which came first, the exercise routine or the wealth?

Let’s find out!

A survey of the wealthy revealed that 76% engaged in aerobic exercises for 30 minutes per day, 4 days per week.¹ The same survey revealed that only 23% of the non-wealthy do the same.

So the question isn’t whether the wealthy work out. It’s whether exercise played a role in their journey to financial security.

The connection isn’t as clear as we may like. That’s because correlation doesn’t equal causation. Plenty of wealthy people also read a lot (see my other article on the connection between wealth and reading). But no one would claim that reading alone created their prosperity. The same could be argued for exercise—perhaps the wealthy only found the time to work out after they achieved financial independence!

There’s a host of research that demonstrates the power of exercise to…

  1. Reduce anxiety
  2. Alleviate depression
  3. Stimulate brain activity²

In fact, exercise is as effective as antidepressants in some cases!³ That means exercise may help remove barriers that inhibit your ability to build your goals and achieve your dreams. It can also fuel the creativity you need to help solve problems and increase your potential market value. One study discovered that physical activity in men resulted in a 14-17% increase in income over a 15 year period.⁴

The takeaway? Imitate the wealthy and get some exercise! It’s a non-financial habit that may pave the way to better mental health and help position you to achieve greater things, wealth-related or not.

¹ “Why Is Aerobic Exercise Important to Building Wealth?” Thomas Corley, Rich Habits, Aug 25, 2020, https://richhabits.net/why-is-aerobic-exercise-so-important-to-building-wealth/ ² “The Mental Health Benefits of Exercise,” Lawrence Robinson, Jeanne Segal, Ph.D., and Melinda Smith, M.A., HelpGuide.org Oct 2020, https://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-living/the-mental-health-benefits-of-exercise.htm# ³ “Exercise is an all-natural treatment to fight depression,” Harvard Health Publishing, Feb 2, 2021, https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-is-an-all-natural-treatment-to-fight-depression ⁴ “8 Daily Rituals Most Millionaires Have In Common,” Lou Carlozo, Money Under 30, Nov 16, 2020 https://www.moneyunder30.com/millionaires-daily-rituals


Step by Step Guide to Creating Your Budget

Step by Step Guide to Creating Your Budget

Creating a budget doesn’t have to be confusing!

In fact, it can be a straightforward—and profoundly enlightening—exercise that reveals your available cash flow and where you can reduce spending.

Here’s your step by step guide to creating a simple budget!

Get a pen and paper (or laptop). You’ll need a place to write and crunch a few simple numbers. If you’re “old school”, a pen, piece of paper, and a calculator will work perfectly. But you can also use a text document or spreadsheet if you’d rather!

Also, consider using a budgeting app. They’re simple tools right on your phone that you can use to track your income and outgo.

Make a list of all your monthly expenses, including housing, utilities, groceries, and transportation. Then, log in to your online banking account. You should be able to determine your average monthly spending in all of your expense categories. Write down those numbers in your budget.

Add up how much you spend in each category. That’s your total average monthly spending!

Then, subtract that number from your income to calculate your average available cash flow. That’s how much money you have leftover each month to tackle debt, save for emergencies, or use to start building wealth.

If it’s a smaller number than you expected, it’s ok. You’ve taken a very important step to face reality and move forward financially! You now know what you’re spending each month, and on what. Look at categories like entertainment and dining out. Can you reduce your monthly spending in these areas?

If your budget is tight and cash still isn’t flowing as freely as you’d like, you may need to consider starting a side hustle or part-time business to help make up the difference.

Ask me if you need help constructing your budget. It’s a simple process that can seriously improve your financial wellness.


Boost Your Daily Routine with These 3 Financial Habits

Boost Your Daily Routine with These 3 Financial Habits

It’s late Friday afternoon. Your to-do list is a crumpled, coffee-stained memory in the bottom of your wastebasket. Another great week in the books!

But as you head out for a night on the town with friends or maybe cuddle up next to your kids to watch their favorite movie, did you ever consider how you spent your after-work time during the week?

Whether you’re routine-driven, a free spirit, or somewhere in between, setting aside a few minutes every day to spend on your finances has the potential to make a huge difference in the long run. By adding these 3 financial habits to your daily routine, you have the potential to give yourself a little more power over your finances.

1. Check your inbox (or mailbox). Whether you pay your bills via credit card, automatic withdrawal, or a hand-written check that you mail in to the company, a daily look-see will help you stay on top of any alerts you get. Spend a few minutes every day glancing over incoming bills, payment receipts, and new online transactions. Being aware of the exodus (or pending exodus) of your money can help fend off late fees, overdrawing your accounts, or maxing out your credit card.

2. Review your spending. Every evening, take quick stock of any spending you did that day – whether in brick-and-mortar stores or online. This exercise can be eye-opening. For instance, are you in the habit of grabbing a piping hot cup of coffee from the drive-thru on your morning commute? Depending on your coffee preference, that can cost up to $5 a day! Maybe 5 bucks isn’t a huge deal, but consider this:

  • $5 for coffee x 5 days a week = $25
  • $25 a week x 4 weeks/month = $100
  • That’s $100 per month spent on coffee!

Just staying aware of those little daily expenditures may make a huge difference in your financial health; when you know how much you’re paying over time for something you could prepare at home (for far less money), you may decide to scale back on the barista-brewed coffee so you can help boost your financial future – and keep yourself on the path to financial independence.

3. Learn a little more. Knowing how money works is a vital part of achieving and maintaining financial independence. Taking a few moments every day to educate yourself a little more about money can make a huge difference in the long run. It can keep you aware of best practices for money management and all the ways your money can work for you. Try a blog post, YouTube video, or a best-seller on finances to keep yourself informed and up to date.

As you start putting these simple financial habits in place, contact me any time! Together we can assess how these small changes could help strengthen your financial strategy and get you closer to financial independence.


What You See Is What You Get: The Power Of Visualization

What You See Is What You Get: The Power Of Visualization

Imagination is underrated.

We live in a world of dollars and cents, ones and zeros, and cold, hard facts. Dreams and hopes are great, but results will always be our number one priority.

But what if your imagination mattered?

What if your mind’s eye actually held the key to success? There’s strong evidence that actually visualizing certain outcomes can reduce stress and empower you to achieve your goals and dreams. It might sound like voodoo, but it’s actually not! Here’s how it works.

Mind and Muscle <br> Your brain is connected to your body. Your brain registers things that happen to your arms and legs and ears and lets you know if they’re good or bad. A soft blanket? Good! Stubbing your toe? Bad!

But the connection between your brain and body goes both ways. Imagining an action in your mind can actually improve your performance in real life. There’s plenty of anecdotal evidence for this; legends like Arnold Schwarzenegger and Muhammad Ali were big believers in imagining specific outcomes.(1&2) But there’s also research to back it up. People who imagined exercising certain muscles gained almost as much strength as people who physically exercised!(3)

Visualization can also reduce stress. Studies have found that novice surgeons and police officers who receive imagery training feel less stress and have less objective stress.(4)

Some visualization tips <br> Imagining yourself on a generic island paradise in 15 years is just daydreaming. The key to effective visualization is specificity. Be as precise as possible. Break down how you’ll achieve your goal or throw that game-winning pass into as many tiny movements as possible, and imagine how you’ll execute each one. Incorporate your senses; what will you smell and hear when you finally achieve that goal?

Verbal affirmations can also help with this visualization process. Take a page from Muhammad Ali, and tell yourself that you’re the greatest every morning before you get breakfast! Even better, say your goal out loud before you go to bed or eat lunch. Writing up a mission statement that you read daily or making a vision board of images that inspire you are also ways to boost your visualization!

Just remember that one of the key strengths of visualization is that you can do it anywhere. Develop your goals, make them as specific as possible, and then start imagining!

(1) https://www.forbes.com/sites/lidijaglobokar/2020/03/05/the-power-of-visualization-and-how-to-use-it/#12e463d66497

(2) https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/flourish/200912/seeing-is-believing-the-power-visualization

(3) https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/flourish/200912/seeing-is-believing-the-power-visualization

(4) https://www.forbes.com/sites/lidijaglobokar/2020/03/05/the-power-of-visualization-and-how-to-use-it/#12e463d66497


Morning Habits You Can Start Tomorrow

Morning Habits You Can Start Tomorrow

Most of our mornings aren’t very fun. We roll out of bed, maybe hit snooze a few times, and then crawl into work feeling groggy at best.

But it doesn’t have to be like this. The morning hours can be times of relaxation, focus, and self-improvement. Here are a few practical habits that can take your mornings from pointless to productive!

Go to bed early <br> Stayed up too late watching just one more episode of your favorite show? Don’t expect to wake up feeling motivated. A productive morning starts the night before. Try to stay away from screens before going to bed (at least one hour) and make sure you turn in at a reasonable time. You may also want to dial back when you wake up. Having a quiet hour or two before everyone else wakes up is a great way of freeing up time to invest in things you care about. Just remember that your new sleep schedule will take some time to adjust to!

Exercise first thing <br> One of the best habits to fill your new-found morning hours is exercise. It’s a great way to get your blood flowing and boost your energy. Plus, the feeling that you’ve accomplished something can help carry you through the day and boost your confidence.

Prioritize your tasks <br> But let’s say you’ve started getting up an hour and a half earlier and you work out for 30 minutes. How are you going to spend the next hour before you start getting ready for work? One great habit is to start planning out your day and prioritizing your tasks. Write down what specifically you want to accomplish and when. You might be amazed by how empowering it is to make a plan and to see your goals on a piece of paper. Start off with your biggest task. The morning is when you’re at your peak brain power, so commit your best efforts to the hardest work. The feeling of accomplishment from knocking out the task will carry you through the smaller things!

Mornings don’t have to be rough. Incorporating these tips and habits into your daily routine can help make the first hours of the day a time you look forward to. Start inching your alarm closer towards sunrise and use that extra time to absolutely crush your day!


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New Year, New (Financial) You!

New Year, New (Financial) You!

The new year is best known for resolutions. The trouble is that many new year’s resolutions don’t survive past the first month or so.

Why is that? You might suspect it’s because we set unrealistic goals or lack the proper motivation.

If you’ve got some financial resolutions you want to stick to, the key is to set realistic goals and have the proper discipline to hang in there, especially when the going gets tough.

Consider the following tips. Everyone can improve their finances and – as a bonus – you won’t end up with a basement full of barely-used exercise equipment that’s standing in for clothes drying racks.

Put away your credit cards
Do you have a fireproof box at home? (You probably should to store your extra-important documents, like the title to your car or your will.) This might be the perfect place for your credit cards. Many families struggle with credit card debt and in many cases, they aren’t even sure where the money actually went.

Credit can be a crutch that only ends up helping us postpone healthy financial habits. The frequent result is years of accumulating interest payments and growing balances that may prevent you from maximizing your savings. (Debt also may lead to household friction.) Lock the credit cards in the strongbox and make a pact with the rest of your household to use a credit card just for when you have a real emergency – and this would only occur if you’ve depleted your normal emergency fund.

Get your own life insurance policy
It’s great to see families insured by at least an employer-sponsored policy, but how insured are they really? Employer plans usually don’t follow you to the next job, and the benefit for your family is typically limited to a fixed amount, such as $50,000, or in some cases up to one to two times your salary.[i] That’s probably not enough coverage for your family – and it might disappear at any time if you were to change jobs. Get a quote for your own life insurance policy that better meets your needs and that you can control.

Make a budget
Many of us think we know where our money goes, but making a budget will illuminate your spending in vivid, full-color detail. You might startle your family with loud exclamations as you realize how much you actually spend on gourmet coffee stops, eating out, clothes, golf accessories, etc. It can add up quickly. A budget may not only help you cut spending, but it may also help you build your emergency savings (yes, this should be a budget item) and start piling away more money for retirement (another necessary budget item).

Know your number
Nope, not the winning lottery number. In this case, your number is the one that can help you reach a financial goal. Saving for retirement without knowing how much you’ll need or how much you can put away each month is like running a race blindfolded. You need to see the course and the finish line ahead. That’s your number. Whether saving, paying down debt, or accomplishing any other financial goal, you need to identify the number that will define your short-term targets and help you reach your ultimate destination.

If you need help with your goals or aren’t sure how to find the number you need to know to prepare for your future, reach out. I have some ideas we can discuss.


[i] https://www.policygenius.com/life-insurance/group-life-insurance/

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Don't Panic: What You Need To Know For Your Life Insurance Medical Exam

Don't Panic: What You Need To Know For Your Life Insurance Medical Exam

I don’t know about you, but most people don’t like exams – either taking one or having one done to them.

But there’s no need to panic over your life insurance medical exam (yes, you’re probably going to have one). I’ve got some steps you can take before the “big day” to help prevent readings which may skew your test results or create unnecessary confusion.

One important thing to keep in mind is that the exam’s purpose isn’t to pass or fail you based on your health. Your insurer just needs to understand the big picture so they can assign an accurate rating. Oftentimes, the news can be better than expected, and generally good health is rewarded with a lower rate. Alternatively, the exam might uncover something that needs attention, like high cholesterol. That might be something good to know so you can make necessary lifestyle changes.

Think of your exam as a big-picture view. Your insurer will measure several key aspects of your health. These areas help determine your life insurance class, which is simply a group of people with similar overall health characteristics.

Your insurer will most likely look at:

  • Height and weight
  • Pulse/blood pressure tests
  • Blood test
  • Urine test

Tests can indicate glucose levels, blood pressure levels, and the presence of nicotine or other substances. Body Mass Index (BMI) – a measurement of overall fitness in regard to weight – may also be measured as part of your life insurance exam.

So let’s find out what you can do to prepare for your exam!

The most obvious cause that could affect your results is medications you’ve taken recently. These will probably show up in your blood tests. Bring a list of any prescription medications you’re taking so your insurer can match those to the blood analysis.

Over the counter meds can interfere with test results and create inaccurate readings too, so it might be best to avoid them for 24 hours prior to your medical exam if possible. Caffeine can cause spikes in blood pressure.¹ Limit your caffeine intake or avoid it altogether, if possible, for 48 hours prior to your exam. Smoking can elevate blood pressure as well.²

Alcohol has a similar effect on blood pressure.³ Try to avoid alcohol for 48 hours prior to taking your life insurance medical exam. Some types of exercise can also spike blood pressure readings temporarily.⁴ If you can, avoid strenuous exercise for 24 hours before your medical exam.

Some types of foods can create false readings or temporarily raise cholesterol levels.⁵ It’s best to avoid eating for 12 hours prior to your exam, giving your body time to clear temporary effects. Scheduling your exam for the morning makes this easier.

Stress can affect blood pressure readings.⁶ (Surprise, surprise.) Try to schedule your life insurance medical exam for a time when you’ll be less stressed. After work might not be the best time, but maybe after a good night’s rest would be better.

Have any further questions on how you can prepare for your exam? I’m here to help!


Sources:
¹ Sheps, Dr. Sheldon G. “Caffeine: How does it affect blood pressure?” Mayo Clinic, 10.19.17, https://mayocl.in/2DB4pSt.
² “Smoking, High Blood Pressure and Your Health.” American Heart Association, 1.10.2018, https://bit.ly/2pSR2HE.
³ “Short-term Negative Effects of Alcohol Consumption.” BACtrack, 2018, https://bit.ly/2E5iOFX.
⁴ Barlowe, Barrett. “Does Exercise Raise Blood Pressure?” Livestrong, 8.14.2017, https://bit.ly/2GGKd6K.
⁵ Hetzler, Lynn. “What Not to Eat Before Cholesterol Check.” Livestrong, 8.14.2017, https://bit.ly/2J01mq9.
⁶ “Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure.” American Heart Association, 1.29.2018, https://bit.ly/2Ghc11T.

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Helping Kids Get Physically Fit

Helping Kids Get Physically Fit

We know that for adults, the benefits of being physically active are myriad.

Reducing the risks of heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, and obesity are worthy goals we should strive for. But how often do we think of these health concerns when it comes to our kids? They’re just kids, right?

When was the last time your kids exercised for an hour every day during the week? According to the US Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, this is the recommended amount of physical activity for children and youth.*

However, statistics show that a large majority (more than two-thirds) of children and adolescents don’t meet this standard. Although it’s typical that physical activity tends to decrease with age, developing an active lifestyle while young will likely influence activity levels into adulthood. For instance, if you used to run half-marathons as a teen, the idea of running a half-marathon now – as an adult – wouldn’t be as jarring as if you had never done that at all.

Studies show that there are several factors that can help increase physical activity in children. The first factor is the parents’ activity level. Simply put, active parent = active child. This is relevant for adults who don’t have their own kids, but have nephews, nieces, or kids they mentor. An adult’s level of activity can help foster the activity levels of the children they influence.

Another factor is getting children involved in a rec league or team sport. By adding these into a child’s weekly schedule, each extra hour per week of practice, games, meets, etc., adds nearly 10 minutes to the average daily physical activity for the child. They’ll never have time for exercise if it’s never scheduled to begin with. (This tactic works for adults, too, by the way.)

This much is true: being physically active while younger will affect the health of a child as they grow into an adult. So whether you have children of your own or children you are connected to, your level of activity can help contribute to building a habit of physical activity which will carry on into adulthood. Here’s to building our health, and our children’s, for the future!


Source:
“Physical Activity Facts.” Centers For Disease Control and Prevention*, 6.28.2017, http://bit.ly/2muNrvY.

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A New Year and New Opportunities to Teach Kids About Finances

A New Year and New Opportunities to Teach Kids About Finances

Kids aren’t getting the financial education they need: Only 20 states require high school students to take an economics course.

Right now at the beginning of a new year is a great time to share your financial knowledge and help your kids put it into practice. Imagine what can happen if your kids learn good savings habits when they’re still kids. When they hit their 20s and get their first “real” job, they can start setting aside a bit of their paycheck each month right away. Their money will have literally decades to grow.

The earlier they start saving, the better their chances of a well-funded retirement.

Waiting too long to save for retirement has a high cost. For example, if the goal is to retire at 65 with $1 million, when you start saving has a huge impact.

To retire at 65 with $1 million (using a 5% tax-deferred hypothetical account):*

  • Start saving at 25, and put away $655.30 per month.
  • Start saving at 35, and put away $1201.55 per month.
  • Start saving at 45, and put away $2432.89 per month.
  • Start saving at 55, and put away $6439.88 per month.

And if you wait until 60 to start saving? You’ll need to put away $14,704.57!

So back to you and your kids. Chances are the majority of your children’s financial education will happen at home. Feel free to use the above illustration to explain the importance of early retirement saving to your 8-year-old, but be warned – you might get a blank stare or a full-on fidget fest. Luckily for everybody involved, there’s a simple exercise you can do with your kids today to give them a head’s up about what it might be like to set aside some of their paycheck when the time comes.

For the really young ones, each time they receive money (earned, received as a gift, etc.), help them save part of it. It really is that simple. No complicated formulas or examples. After all, the basis of saving for retirement is…saving money. If your kids are a little older and ready for the next step, help them save with a specific goal in mind, like 1 big toy or activity at the end of the month.

Working on exercises like this with your kids has the potential to make a huge difference for them when they start preparing for retirement. It may seem small, but you’re laying the groundwork for solid financial literacy, one saved dollar at a time.


*In this hypothetical example, a 5% compounded rate of return is assumed on hypothetical monthly investments over different time periods. The example is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent any specific investment. It is unlikely that any one rate of return will be sustained over time. This example does not reflect any taxes, or fees and charges associated with any investment. If they had been applied, the period of time to reach a $1 million retirement goal would be longer. Also, keep in mind, that income taxes are due on any gains when withdrawn.

Source:
Council for Economic Education: “Survey of the States.” 2016

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Ways to Curb Holiday Spending

Ways to Curb Holiday Spending

More than 174 million Americans have already spent an average of $335.47 each between Thanksgiving and Cyber Monday this year.

What does your own holiday spending bill look like so far? Use these 3 simple ideas to help cut down on your expenses this time of year, and keep the rest of your holiday spending looking more nice than naughty.

1. Decide beforehand how much you’re going to spend on gifts.
Yes, I’m talking about the B-word: Budget. This time of year it’s especially important to exercise discipline with purchases. Have a firm plan about what you’re able to spend before you start tackling your seasonal shopping list, so you can avoid the “holiday hangover” when your January credit card bill arrives. Challenging yourself to stick to a budget can help get the creative gift-giving juices flowing, too. If you’re crafty, there are tons of ideas online for budget-friendly, thoughtful gifts. If you’re not crafty, check out your local dollar store (lately they’ve been really upping their game) or thrift store for low-cost, unique treasures that your giftees will appreciate.

2. Dine in.
When you’ve budgeted for picking up the tab for a celebratory family meal at your favorite restaurant, it can be a great gift that brings everyone together – literally. But if you haven’t financially prepared for a big night out with the whole extended crew, the final cost of the festivities can really sneak up on you. Say you venture out with a party of 15 family members. At even just $10 an entree, if you add in appetizers, desserts, cups of cocoa for the kids, eggnog (or something a little more “grown up” for the adults), and any other extras… Whew, that’s going to be a credit card statement to remember! But what if you planned a night in with the family instead? The whole point is just being together, right? Have a potluck or pizza night (try retailmenot.com for online coupons!). The warmth and comfort of home. Baking cookies. Holiday music in the background. You can still enjoy cups of cocoa and eggnog, but at a fraction of the cost. (Here are some ideas for setting up your own “hot cocoa bar”.)

3. Stay with relatives when you travel home for the holidays.
This practice is standard for some, but if this suggestion makes your face flush or your blood run cold, this may help you change your mind: the average hotel stay costs $127.69 per night (and that’s not even including taxes and fees). Let’s say you’re heading to the town where you grew up for 4 days and 3 nights. The 3 nights at a hotel are going to cost you…

  • $127.69 x 3 = $383.07

Add in tax and hotel fees as well as the daily cost of gas to and from the hotel, and the thought of a few nights spent in your childhood bedroom (that now has a surprise treadmill-as-a-clothing-rack addition), might not be so terrible.

Saving doesn’t have to mean sacrificing holiday spirit! How many of these tips are you going to use?


Sources:
National Retail Federation: “Consumers and Retailers Win Big Over Thanksgiving Holiday.” 11.28.2017
Family Feedbag: “Best ever chocolate chip cookies (gift-giving mix!)” 12.2012
HGTV: “Set Up a Holiday Hot Chocolate Bar.”
Statistica: “Monthly average daily rate of United States hotels from 2011 to 2017 (in U.S. dollars).” 2017

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Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Reduce Your Risk Today

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Reduce Your Risk Today

All of the info on this blog about reducing your financial risks – tailoring life insurance coverage, managing cashflow, preparing for retirement – is here for you for one reason: your financial wellness is one of the most important things you can have and maintain.

But solid financial “health” is harder to enjoy if your physical health is suffering. It’s like being all dressed up with no place to go!

In fact, 37% of US citizens surveyed said that their physical health was most essential to their financial future – even more essential than happiness (19%), security (19%), peace of mind (16%), and independence (9%).

Research in Canada has uncovered that people who are financially unwell are less likely to engage in physically healthy activities. Only 51% of the financially unwell claimed to be in good health. And to top it off, 60% of the financially unprepared delayed or even avoided medical help completely. But avoiding the doctor when you’re sick is never a good idea.

Many illnesses are easier to treat when they’re caught early – and this month is dedicated to spreading awareness about the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women around the world: breast cancer.

Somewhere in the world, a woman dies from breast cancer – Every. Single. Minute. That adds up to more than 1,400 women per day. And illnesses like cancer do not discriminate: While it’s rare, breast cancer does occur in men, too.

You can’t control all of your risk factors for breast cancer, but there are a few things you can do to reduce your risk:

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise at least 4 hours a week
  • Get enough sleep
  • Avoid or limit alcohol to 1 drink per day
  • Limit exposure to carcinogens or chemicals known to cause cancer

Any of these can be started today! And don’t forget: Talking with your doctor about your personal risk factors as well can make a world of difference for you and your loved ones.


Sources:
Transamerica: “New Transamerica Survey Shows Investors Identify Health as Key Component to Their Financial Planning and Security.” 10.6.2016
Manulife: “How your employees’ financial wellness affects your business.” 2016
The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation: “Breast Cancer Fact Sheet.” 2.2017
CDC: “What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Breast Cancer?” 9.27.2017

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