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Should You Live With Your Parents?

Should You Live With Your Parents?

Plenty of people move back in with their parents.

Data found that 37% of Californians and close to 1.9 million people in Canada between 18 and 64 live with their parents (1 & 2). That might not sound ideal, but is it really that bad? Here are some pros and cons to consider before deciding to move back home.

Pros
Living with your parents isn’t necessarily the end of the world. For starters, it might be cheaper than renting an apartment or buying a house, depending on the deal your parents offer you. Negotiating rent with your mom is typically easier than wrangling with a landlord! On that note, at home you’ll be surrounded by people who love you. That can be a serious boost to your mental health and give you some footing for your next move. And you can’t forget that free food is awesome. (If that’s part of the deal!)

Cons
But moving back in might not necessarily be all rainbows and sunshine. It can be incredibly demoralizing for many people. We tend to estimate our self-worth and how much we’ve accomplished by our independence from our parents. It’s easy to see living with our parents as a step back. Plus, it can encourage laziness. Not having to hustle for food and rent can remove a sense of urgency from your work. Nothing motivates you quite like the imminent threat of bankruptcy!

If you have to move back in with your parents, do it with a plan. Maybe you give yourself six months at home to get your business off the ground. Your goal might be more long-term like caring for a parent. Just remember to take it in stride and don’t let it derail your life!

1) Matt Levin, “Nearly 40 Percent Of Young Adult Californians Live With Their Parents. Here’s Everything To Know About Them,” Cal Matters, August 25, 2019.

2) Statistics Canada, “Family Matters: Adults living with their parents.” The Daily, February 15, 2019.


So You’ve Graduated...Now What?

So You’ve Graduated...Now What?

Graduating from college is a big deal.

It represents a transition from student to adult for millions of people. But leaving university and joining the workforce can be intimidating. Looking for a job, paying bills, commuting, and living independently are often uncharted territory for recent grads.

Here are a few tips for fresh graduates trying to get on their feet financially.

Figure out what you want
It’s one thing to leave college with an idea of what career you want to pursue. It’s something else entirely to ask yourself what kind of life you want. It’s one of those big issues that can be difficult even to wrap your head around!

However, it’s something that’s important to grapple with. It will help you answer questions like “What kind of lifestyle do I want to live” and “how much will it cost to do the things I want?” You might even find that you don’t really need some of the things that you thought were necessities, and that happiness comes from places you might not have expected.

Come up with a budget
Let’s say you’ve got a ballpark idea of your financial and lifestyle goals. It’s time to come up with a strategy. There are plenty of resources on starting a budget on this blog and the internet on the whole, but the barebones of budgeting are pretty simple. First, figure out how much you make, how much you have to spend, how much you actually spend, then subtract your total spending from how much you make. Get a positive number? Awesome! Use that leftover cash to start saving for retirement (it’s never too early!) or build up an emergency fund. Negative number? Look for places in your unnecessary spending to cut back and maybe consider a side hustle to make more money.

Looking at your spending habits can be difficult. But owning up to mistakes you might be making and coming up with a solid strategy can be far easier than the agony that spending blindly may bring. That’s why starting a budget is a post-graduation must!

Meet with a financial professional
Find a qualified and licensed financial professional and schedule an appointment. Don’t let the idea of meeting with a professional intimidate you. Afterall, you trust your health, car, and legal representation to properly trained experts. Why wouldn’t you do the same with your financial future?

Being scared of starting a new chapter of life is natural. There are a lot of new experiences and unknowns to deal with that come along with leaving the familiarity of college. But the best way to overcome fear is to face it head on. These tips are a great way to start taking control of your future!

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Getting a Degree of Financial Security

Getting a Degree of Financial Security

The financial advantage gap between having a college degree and just having a high school diploma is widening!

In 2015, the average college graduate earned 56% more than the average high school graduate. This is the widest gap between the two that the Economic Policy Institute has recorded since 1973!

This income difference is making saving for retirement difficult for millennials without a college degree. According to the Young Invincibles’ 2017 ‘Financial Health of Young America’ study, millennial college grads – even with roadblocks like student debt – have saved nearly $21,000 for retirement. That’s quite a lot more as compared to the amount saved by those with a high school diploma only: under $8,000.

However, a college grad may encounter a different type of retirement savings roadblock than a reduced income – student loan debt. But the numbers show that even with student loan debt, the advantages of having a college degree and a solid financial strategy outweigh the retirement saving power of not having a college degree.

Here’s an issue plaguing both groups:more than two-thirds of all millennial workers surveyed do not have a specific retirement plan in place at all.

Regardless of your level of education or your level of income, you can save for your retirement – and take steps toward your financial independence. Or maybe even finance a college education for yourself or a loved one down the road.

The first step to making the most of what you do have is meeting with a financial professional who can help put you on the path to a solid financial strategy. Contact me today. Let’s work to get your money working for you.


Sources:
USA TODAY: “Pay gap between college grads and everyone else at a record.” 1.12.2017
Young Invincibles: “Financial Health of Young America.” 2017
The Pew Charitable Trusts: “Retirement Plan Access and Participation Across Generations.” 2.15.2017

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